Tag Archives: privacy

Song: Social Network B


I want to introduce my child to online social networks but how best to explain some of the risks involved? Thought I’d start with a song…

This is a rewrite of the traditional folk song “Sloop John B”, famously covered by the Beach Boys (www.youtube.com/watch?v=nSAoEf1Ib58) although Cap’n Tom Jones deserves a mention for his singing attire: www.youtube.com/watch?v=fyQeHavCfPg

Video URL (with captions): Social Network B song

Downloads

For your downloading pleasure, here are the video and audio–only files.

License is Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 Unported. If you need a media player, I recommend VLC.

Lyrics

We joined a social network.
Me and my best friend, Bert.
Around that walled garden
we did roam.
Surfing all night.
Got into a fight.
I had so much fun,
I don’t wanna go home.

I got a message from Jen,
my girlfriend from way back when,
but now she just won’t
leave me alone.
What did I say?
Why does she haunt me this way?
She’s nice ‘n’ all but
I wish she’d go home.

Then there’s that guy named Ray.
He took me to a crazy partay
and he took lots of photos
with his cell phone.
Now everyone’s seen
me doing that… thing.
I’m tired of getting laughed at.
I wanna go home.

Then there’s those men in black.
They won’t get off my back,
ever since they gave me
that emergency loan.
How do they know
every place that I go?
I’m getting kinda scared now.
I gotta go home.

But now my whole family
has signed up, just like me.
It’s the only way
I keep in touch with my mom.
It’s part of our lives.
How did we ever survive?
Now we’re in the network,
we’re not going home.
Once you’re in the network,
you can never go home.

How to wipe a hard drive with Linux

An opened hard driveI have an old hard drive I want to throw away but I don’t want any remaining photos, financial documents or other personal data getting in the wrong hands. In other words, I want to completely and securely wipe the drive. With Linux there are several options and after a bit of research, here’s what I consider the best way.

Firstly, programs such as fdisk, cfdisk or GParted are not sufficient to fully erase data—they just edit a drive’s partition table. What we want is something more thorough. The standard way to do this is to overwrite data on a drive with randomly-generated data. There are several command-line programs to do this (see below for a comparison) but I’ve chosen shred. Its default is three passes (overwriting all data three times) which I’m comfortable with, but you can specify more if you like, e.g. -p 10 for 10 passes.

WARNING! You don’t need me to tell you that accidentally erasing the wrong data could cause you big problems. Please be careful and check, then double-check each command and especially drive name before pressing Enter.

Step 1.
Plug in the hard drive and find its name (sdb, sdc, etc.). Use

dmesg

and look for something like sdb: sdb1

Step 2.
Unmount each partition of the drive (sdb1, sdb2, etc.), e.g.

sudo umount /dev/sdb1

Step 3.
Type the following command for writing random data to the drive three times (default). DON’T PRESS ENTER.

sudo shred -f -v /dev/[your drive name]

Step 4.
Double-check that the drive you’ve specified is the correct one to wipe. OK, now you can press Enter.

Programs for deleting data

badblocks

Purpose: “Search a device for bad blocks”

sudo badblocks -w -t random -p 1 -s /dev/sdb

Summary: A single (-p 1) overwrite (-w) with random data (-t random), showing progress (-s).
Time for 6GB: 16 mins 20 secs

dd

Purpose: “Convert and copy a file”
Notes: You can’t see your progress or specify multiple passes.
Got stuck with faulty drive.

sudo dd if=/dev/urandom of=/dev/sdb

Summary: A single overwrite with random data.
Time for 6GB: 1 hr 5 mins

shred

Purpose: “Overwrite a file to hide its contents, and optionally delete it”

sudo shred -f -v -n 1 /dev/sdb

Summary: Force (-f) a single (-n 1) overwrite with random data, showing progress (-v).
Time for 6GB: 10 mins 6 secs

wipe

Purpose: “Securely erase files from magnetic media”
Notes: Not in default Ubuntu (sudo apt-get install wipe). After running this, I had a few errors running the other commands on the same drive.

sudo wipe -kD -i -q -Q 1 /dev/sdb

Summary: A single (-q -Q 1) overwrite with random data, showing progress (-i), keeping the device’s inode intact (-kD).
Time for 6GB: 9 mins 37 secs

Further information

Smashing a hard disk with a hammerWiping the drive as explained above is good enough for most purposes but forensic experts have amazing skills and tools at their disposal. It may theoretically still be possible to access some of your deleted data. The most secure way to prevent people accessing any data left on your drive is physically drilling, crushing and breaking up the drive, then disposing of the parts in various locations. And encrypting the drive in the first place with TrueCrypt, for example, is also a good idea.

Related links

How to install Truecrypt on Fedora

I’ve tried on several versions of Fedora but never really been able to install Truecrypt. Either it’s resulted in lots of errors or I’ve given up after getting tired of fruitless searching and reading.

At last I’ve found a guide that’s not too long and works!

It’s written for Truecrypt 6.2 on Fedora 11 but worked perfectly for me with Truecrypt 6.3a on Fedora 12:

penguinenclave.blogspot.com/2009/07/truecrypt-62-install-guide-for-fedora.html

Of course, it would be best if Truecrypt was available in Linux repositories but from what I understand, the way it’s written makes it very difficult for distros to package and maintain. Even so, the greatness of Truecrypt still makes it worth doing yourself.